Departmental Colloquium Series

Sociology Department Colloquium Series
BLUMER ROOM - 402 BARROWS HALL
Mondays, 2:00 - 3:30 PM
[unless otherwise noted]
  • In China Constructing Capitalism: Economic Life and Urban Change (2013), we - drawing on a decade’s research and experience - argue that China‘s is not neo-liberal.  Instead there are neo-Daoist and Neo-Confucian routines, which - though they may not have...

  • The body is increasingly the focus of social science research, yet scant
    attention has been given to how bodies move, how habits of movement are
    acquired and what that may tell us about race, gender, and sexuality.
    Craig's forthcoming book places ethnographic observation and...
  • Government taxes and spends less in the United States than in most other rich countries, and much of our political debate centers on how much to cut from key programs. I argue that in coming decades we're likely to move in the other direction...

  • What can professional dominatrices teach us about ourselves?  Drawing upon observational fieldwork and interviews with women who work as professional dominatrices (“pro-dommes”) in New York City and San Francisco, Dominatrix: Gender, Eroticism, and Control in the Dungeon...

  • Over the last two decades, there has been a dramatic shift in the way Latin American states classify their populations on censuses. Abandoning color-blind approaches, states have adopted census questions that register the presence of indigenous and afro-descendent individuals within national...

  • The rising number of individuals being released from prison has prompted renewed interest among researchers, policy makers, and practitioners in reintegrating former prisoners. Yet relatively little is known about the social contexts into which former prisoners return...

  • Although "partisan polarization" has been a major topic within political science for a decade, analysts have been very slow to recognize that polarization largely results from a dramatic and persistent shift of the GOP to the right. The reluctance to accept that polarization is "...

  • After centuries of slavery and formal caste subordination, in the three decades following WWII, hundreds of thousands of black people joined insurgent social movements in the U.S. Why did their insurgency thrive in these years? Classical social movement theories, founded on the study of black...

  • “Looking Beyond the Election: The Shape of America’s Future”

    This is the first in an occasional series of panels exploring factors shaping American society–and global society–now and in the future.

    The first panel includes distinguished faculty from...

  • We offer an explanation for the expansion of formal organization­in numbers, internal complexity, social domains, and national contexts­and of the fact that much expansion lies in domains of the collective good far beyond the traditional foci on technical production or political power...

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