Christopher Muller

Christopher Muller's picture
Assistant Professor
Research Interests: 
Inequality, Incarceration, Historical Sociology
Office: 
496 Barrows Hall
Phone: 
510-643-6380
Curriculum Vitae: 
Profile: 

I study the historical origins of racial inequality in incarceration in the United States, the social consequences of imprisonment, the economic institutions introduced after the abolition of slavery in the United States, and trends in mortality in the early twentieth century. I am generally interested in historical approaches to the study of inequality. 

Representative Publications: 

Jonathan L. Zelner, Christopher Muller, and James J. Feigenbaum. 2017. "Racial Inequality in the Annual Risk of Tuberculosis Infection in the United States, 1910-1933." Epidemiology & Infection 145:1797-1804. 

Deirdre Bloome, James J. Feigenbaum, and Christopher Muller. 2017. "Tenancy, Marriage, and the Boll Weevil Infestation, 1892-1930." Demography 54:1029-1049.

James J. Feigenbaum and Christopher Muller. 2016. "Lead Exposure and Violent Crime in the Early Twentieth Century." Explorations in Economic History 62:51-86.

Christopher Muller and Christopher Wildeman. 2016. "Geographic Variation in the Cumulative Risk of Imprisonment and Parental Imprisonment in the United States." Demography 53:1499-1509.

Deirdre Bloome and Christopher Muller. 2015. "Tenancy and African American Marriage in the Postbellum South." Demography 52:1409-1430.

Christopher Muller and Daniel Schrage. 2014. "Mass Imprisonment and Trust in the Law." Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science 651:139-158.

Bruce Western and Christopher Muller. 2013. "Mass Incarceration, Macrosociology, and the Poor." Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science 647:166-189.

Christopher Muller. 2012. "Northward Migration and the Rise of Racial Disparity in American Incarceration, 1880-1950." American Journal of Sociology 118:281-326.

Christopher Wildeman and Christopher Muller. 2012. "Mass Imprisonment and Inequality in Health and Family Life." Annual Review of Law and Social Science 8:11-30.