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Welcome to Berkeley Sociology

Berkeley’s Sociology Department is known around the world for its excellence in research and teaching. For the past six decades, we have consistently been ranked among the world’s top sociology departments, and in 2017 we were #1 in the U.S. News and World Report rankings.

We are proud to contribute to the world’s leading public university, to international sociology, and to the life of the mind beyond the academy. Our faculty teach and do research in most sociological specialties.

Our PhDs are leaders in universities and research centers across the US and in many other countries. And our BAs populate the ranks of innumerable professions, bringing with them the skills and special perspective of Berkeley sociology.

Faculty Spotlight
Neil Fligstein
Professor
Economic sociology, organizations, methodology and statistics, political sociology
Martin Sanchez-Jankowski
Professor
Sociology of poverty, race and ethnicity, social violence, methodology
David J. Harding
Professor
poverty, inequality, causal inference, mixed methods, incarceration and prisoner reentry, education, neighborhood effects, urban communities, adolescence
In Memoriam
Albert Einstein (1941)
Albert Einstein (1941)
EMERITUS PROFESSOR

Prof. Einstein served graduate students as a model of prudence in remaining unfashionably true to the grand…

Faculty Publishing
In this book Neil Fligstein takes issue with prevailing theories of the corporation and proposes a radically new view that has important implications for American competitiveness.

The Transformation of Corporate Control

In this book Neil Fligstein takes issue with prevailing theories of the corporation and proposes a radically new view that has important implications for American competitiveness.
Teach-In Seminar
[homepage] colloquium

Departmental Colloquium Series

Danya Lagos. Gender in the Twenty-First Century: Multiple Dimensions of Identity and Inequality

Monday, November 18th, 2-3:30pm
402 Barrows Hall

Gender is changing rapidly in the twenty-first century, with boundaries becoming more mutable, liminal, and flexible. Survey-based research can help identify sites of gender inequality at the population level, but much of its implementation still reflects a narrow and flat categorization of individuals into two groups: male and female. Social constructionist and interactional approaches have been more successful in handling the major social changes that have taken place in terms of gender, but methodology in survey-based research has not yet caught up to qualitative work.