Colloquia

Sociology Department Colloquium Series
Blumer Room - 402 Barrows Hall
MONDAYS, 2:00 - 3:30 PM
[unless otherwise noted]

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Via Zoom
How do people make sense of their continued reliance on unjust institutions? How do they evaluate potential for redress? Recent research highlights the state as a potential well of moral opportunities to promote dignity and inclusion (Lamont et al. 2016, 2017). Yet the everyday lives for residents of disadvantaged communities are often marked by conflictual interactions with state agents. In this talk, I explore these questions by drawing on a unique data set of 60 semi-structured interviews with recently arrested individuals in Cleveland, Ohio – a city currently under federal consent decree due to police use of excessive force.
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Via Zoom
Humanitarian nongovernmental organizations routinely present themselves as servants of the most longstanding and universal human values. Yet, while their values -- impartiality, neutrality, universality -- are certainly ageless, their social organizations are a much more recent phenomenon. In fact, the idea that humanitarian organizations like the ones we know today should provide emergency aid did not emerge until the nineteenth-century, and was surprisingly controversial when initially proposed by the Red Cross movement. In this talk, I examine the origins of the organizational cultural framework that first enabled humanitarian NGOs and has supported their work for the past 150 years. Drawing on archival research, I trace its origins to an orthodox Calvinist movement that thrived in Geneva in the mid-nineteenth-century.
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via ZOOM
PLEASE NOTE SPECIAL TIME Automation and the Future of Work in the Pandemic Economy
via Zoom
Despite a slack labor market and major barriers to employment, including low-levels of human capital, substance abuse, and the mark of a criminal record, there is strong evidence that tribal men on the Yurok and Hoopa Valley Reservations of Northern California continue to seek work at high rates. Such labor force attachment is unexpected based on theories of cumulative disadvantage in urban areas, where slack labor market conditions (Liebow 1967, Wilson 1987, 1996) and individual barriers to employment (Holzer 1996, Holzer et al. 2006, Pager 2003, 2007, Pager et al. 2009, Pager & Western 2005) have been shown to inhibit labor force participation. The author poses the following research question to engage this puzzle: what explains the continued engagement of tribal men with the world of work despite these overlapping structural and individual constraints?
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Zoom (details to follow)
Chairman Mao’s Children: Politics, Generation, and China’s Difficult Memory
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Blumer Room - 402 Barrows Hall
Which Feminisms?
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Blumer Room - 402 Barrows Hall
Policing and Residential Segregation: Toward a Research and Policy Agenda
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Blumer Room - 402 Barrows Hall
Reception to follow in 420 Barrows Hall The Difficulty of Democracy in Democratic Socialism The greatest challenge for ecological democratic socialism is not the generation of just provisioning and protection of all sentient life.  The hard part is achieving this democratically, especially on a large scale and in a globally integrated world. The lecture meditates on this problem with reference to the utopian dreams of Erik Olin Wright. 
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Blumer Room - 402 Barrows Hall
Whom Do You Believe? Assessing Credibility of the Accuser and Accused in Sexual Assault