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Welcome to Berkeley Sociology

Berkeley’s Sociology Department is known around the world for its excellence in research and teaching. For the past six decades, we have consistently been ranked among the world’s top sociology departments, and in 2017 we were #1 in the U.S. News and World Report rankings.

We are proud to contribute to the world’s leading public university, to international sociology, and to the life of the mind beyond the academy. Our faculty teach and do research in most sociological specialties.

Our PhDs are leaders in universities and research centers across the US and in many other countries. And our BAs populate the ranks of innumerable professions, bringing with them the skills and special perspective of Berkeley sociology.

Faculty Spotlight
Jennifer Johnson-Hanks
Professor
Culture and population, intentions, uncertainty, epistemology, history of population thought, sub-Saharan Africa, family, fertility, gender, life course
Irene Bloemraad
Class of 1951 Professor
Immigration, political sociology, race & ethnicity, social movements, nationalism, research methods, Canada
Sandra Susan Smith
Professor and Department Chair
Urban poverty and joblessness, job search, social capital and social networks, trust and cooperation, and more recently, re-entry and the front end of criminal case processing
In Memoriam
Albert Einstein (1941)
Albert Einstein (1941)
EMERITUS PROFESSOR

Prof. Einstein served graduate students as a model of prudence in remaining unfashionably true to the grand…

Faculty Publishing
America’s high incarceration rates are a well-known facet of contemporary political conversations. Mentioned far less often is what happens to the nearly 700,000 former prisoners who rejo...

On the Outside: Prisoner Reentry and Reintegration

America’s high incarceration rates are a well-known facet of contemporary political conversations. Mentioned far less often is what happens to the nearly 700,000 former prisoners who rejoin society each year. On the Outside examines the lives of 22 people—varied in race and gender but united by their time in the criminal justice system—as they pass out of the prison gates and back into society. The book takes a clear-eyed look at the challenges faced by former prisoners as they try to find work, housing, and stable communities. Standing alongside thes...
Teach-In Seminar
[homepage] colloquium

Departmental Colloquium Series

Natasha Quadlin. Whom Do You Believe? Assessing Credibility of the Accuser and Accused in Sexual Assault

Monday, December 2, 2-3:30pm
402 Barrows Hall

Sexual assault is one of the most prominent issues of our time. Although social scientists have investigated some aspects of sexual assault—e.g., the problem of sexual assault on college campuses—little research has assessed public attitudes toward sexual assault, including whether the public tends to side with the accuser (usually, although not always, a woman) or the accused (usually, although not always, a man). In this talk, I present results from an original nationally representative survey experiment (N = 2,005) designed to examine public attitudes toward the accuser and accused in cases of sexual assault. We consider which party is considered more credible, as well as the specific circumstances surrounding the case that shape perceptions of credibility. Results will be discussed, along with a consideration of theoretical implications for the study of gender attitudes in social science research.