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Welcome to Berkeley Sociology

Berkeley’s Sociology Department is known around the world for its excellence in research and teaching. For the past six decades, Berkeley’s Sociology Department has consistently been among the world’s top sociology departments. While our graduate program is ranked #1 in the latest U.S. News and World Report, our undergrad degree is currently the best in the US according to College Factual and features on Grad reports’ Best college list 2020.

We are proud to contribute to the world’s leading public university, to international sociology, and to the life of the mind beyond the academy. Our faculty teach and do research in most sociological specialties.

Our PhDs are leaders in universities and research centers across the US and in many other countries. And our BAs populate the ranks of innumerable professions, bringing with them the skills and special perspective of Berkeley sociology.

Faculty Spotlight
Armando Lara-Millan
Assistant Professor
Law & Society, Medical Sociology, Organizations, Urban Ethnography, Comparative-Historical, Science & Technology, and Economic Sociology
Sandra Susan Smith
Professor and Department Chair
Urban poverty and joblessness, job search, social capital and social networks, trust and cooperation, and more recently, re-entry and the front end of criminal case processing
Irene Bloemraad
Class of 1951 Professor
Immigration, political sociology, race & ethnicity, social movements, nationalism, research methods, Canada
In Memoriam
Albert Einstein (1941)
Albert Einstein (1941)
EMERITUS PROFESSOR

Prof. Einstein served graduate students as a model of prudence in remaining unfashionably true to the grand…

Faculty Publishing
"In order to recruit new members on a scale that would be required to significantly rebuild union power, unions must fundamentally alter their internal organizational practices. This mean...

Rebuilding Labor: Organizing and Organizers in the New Union Movement

"In order to recruit new members on a scale that would be required to significantly rebuild union power, unions must fundamentally alter their internal organizational practices. This means creating more organizer positions on the staff; developing programs to teach current members how to handle the tasks involved in resolving shop-floor grievances; and building programs that train members to participate fully in the work of external organizing. Such a reorientation entails redefining the very meaning of union membership from a relatively passive stanc...
Teach-In Seminar
[homepage] colloquium

Departmental Colloquium Series

Susan Watkins, "Which Feminisms?"

Monday, March 2, 2-3:30pm
402 Barrows Hall

The rise of a new wave of militant feminisms around the world – its latest symbol: the viral spread of the dance chant, Un violador en tu camino, from Chile to Mexico, Beirut, Nairobi, Delhi – poses a radical challenge to the official gender politics institutionalized in the Washington women’s lobby and the mechanisms of the UN and World Bank – and still a hegemonic force worldwide. I trace the rise of a global feminism, intimately linked to America’s world predominance and neoliberal expansion, which has seen the advance of gender equality go hand-in-hand with rising social inequality. Could the new feminist upsurge herald the possibility of a more coherent egalitarianism?