Colloquia

Sociology Department Colloquium Series
Blumer Room - 402 Social Sciences Building
MONDAYS, 2:00 - 3:30 PM
[unless otherwise noted]

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Blumer Room - 402 Barrows Hall
  Logics in Conflict? Contradictions in Campus Sexual Misconduct Adjudication Recent coverage in the media presents a crisis of "due process" for undergraduates accused of sexual misconduct at American universities. Based on preliminary analysis of the sexual misconduct policies of 381 universities, we argue that the status of the adjudication of student misconduct is indeed problematic, but that--perhaps unsurprisingly--the story in the media is not accurate. Most university policies fail all students, not just those accused,  and likely fail those experiencing misconduct far more grievously than those accused. The policies do no better on "victim protections" than they do on "due process" rights. And more fundamentally, many of the policies are incoherent and vague, in part as a result of  the intersection of multiple and contradictory logics. In the context of the university, sexual violence is variously and simultaneously understood in terms of public health, crime, student conduct, civil rights, religious sin, etc. 
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Blumer Room - 402 Barrows Hall
Co-sponsorship by IRLE and the Berkeley Labor Center
Blumer Room - 402 Barrows Hall
The pedagogy colloquium meets monthly to discuss diverse aspects of teaching at Berkeley, with topics suggested by group participants and occasional guest speakers.   
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Blumer Room - 402 Barrows Hall
  The Importance of Community Contexts in Immigration Detention
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Blumer Room - 402 Barrows Hall
   BERKELEY SOCIOLOGY FORUM Wednesday, April 25, 5-7.30p.m., 402 Barrows Hall BECOMING BLACK POLITICAL SUBJECTS Movements and Ethno-Racial Rights in Colombia and Brazil TIANNA PASCHEL, Assistant Professor of African American Studies at UC Berkeley, will present her award-winning book, Becoming Black Political Subjects (Princeton, 2016) with responses from Tanya Golash-Boza, Mara Loveman, andMichael Watts.
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Blumer Room - 402 Barrows Hall
In association with D-Lab and The Social Science Matrix:   The Great Regression. Machine Learning, Econometrics, and the Future of Quantification.
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Blumer Room - 402 Barrows Hall
  Organizing Pollution: Organizational Demography, Neighborhoods, and Racial Inequality in Exposure to Toxic Chemicals, 1987-2012
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Blumer Room - 402 Barrows Hall
  Unsettled Islam: Virtuous Contention in European Mosques
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Blumer Room - 402 Barrows Hall
  Using sampled social network data to estimate the size of hidden populations  Surveys have traditionally been based on the idea that researchers can estimate characteristics of a population by obtaining a sample of individuals and asking them to report about themselves. Network reporting surveys generalize this traditional approach by asking survey respondents to report about other people to whom they are connected. This approach can be used to study many important rare and hidden populations for which traditional survey methods are inadequate; for example, the approach has been used to estimate the size of epidemiologically important groups like sex workers, drug injectors, and men who have sex with men. It has also been used to estimate critical demographic quantities such as adult death rates. I will introduce a framework for developing estimators from network reporting surveys and then I will present some results from a nationally-representative survey experiment that my colleagues and I conducted in Rwanda.   
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Blumer Room - 402 Barrows Hall
  Actuarial Labors:  Freedom to/at Risk in a Taxi to Uber Economy “Uberization” has become a popular descriptive moniker for the transformation of service work in the post-Recession era.   The Uber model of taxi work, however, is only the latest in a series of neoliberal mutations in corporate and regulatory governance of the industry since the late 1970s.  As with the Uber model, previous mutations have relied upon a discourse of worker “freedom” to make a moral case for the production of risk-laden work.  Based on a decade of engaged ethnographic study of San Francisco’s taxi economy, I examine two pre-Uber shifts that generated earlier iterations of risk(y) work—the rise of long-term leasing and the commodification of medallions.   What was the role of municipal government amidst these shifts, and what kinds of everyday experiences did they produce for drivers?   My findings contrast with accounts of precarity theorized by and through deregulation.  I argue that during both mutations, regulatory and judicial bodies played an active role in producing systems that—far from manufacturing freedom—subjugated workers into peonage.