Colloquia

Sociology Department Colloquium Series
Blumer Room - 402 Barrows Hall
MONDAYS, 2:00 - 3:30 PM
[unless otherwise noted]

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Blumer Room - 402 Barrows Hall
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Blumer Room - 402 Barrows Hall
Tax Evasion and Inequality
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Blumer Room - 402 Barrows Hall
 BERKELEY SOCIOLOGY FORUM Wednesday, September 7, 5-7.30p.m., 402 Barrows Hall STRANGERS IN THEIR OWN LAND: ANGER AND MOURNING ON THE AMERICAN RIGHT   ARLIE HOCHSCHILD, Emerita Professor of Sociology at UC Berkeley, will present her forthcoming book, Strangers in Their Own Land (New Press, 2016) with responses from Cihan Tuğal, Raka Ray andPaul Pierson
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Blumer Room - 402 Barrows Hall
Monday, April 25, 2-3:30pm in 402 Barrows Hall How Things Fall Apart: Race, gender and suspicion in police-civilian encounters
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Blumer Room - 402 Barrows Hall
Labor as Capital: Slavery, Calculation and American Capitalism In the simplifying language of economics there are three inputs of production: land, labor, and capital. Slaves confounded the last of these categories, at once labor and capital, and antebellum American planters used accounting to balance the tradeoffs between them. This talk will examine three settings where planters sought to value, price, and categorize the enslaved: inventories, price lists, and the rating of men as fractions of a “hand.” All of these sites of valuation reflect both the commodification of bondspeople and its limits, raising questions about the relationship between slavery and American capitalism.
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Blumer Room - 402 Barrows Hall
BERKELEY SOCIOLOGY FORUM Wednesday, April 13, 5-7.30p.m., 402 Barrows Hall THE CHINA BOOM Ho-fung Hungis Associate Professor of Sociology at Johns Hopkins University. He will present his book The China Boom: Why China will not Rule the World with responses from Tom Gold, You-tien Hsing and Gillian Hart.
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Blumer Room - 402 Barrows Hall
Millionaire Migration and the Taxation of the Elite: Evidence from Administrative Data
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Blumer Room - 402 Barrows Hall
Friday, April 8, 2-3:30pm in 402 Barrows National Portraits: Racial Conceptualization and the Demographic Imaginary Statistical “facts” about the demographic makeup of the nation often garner considerable public, media and political attention. In the United States, for example, Census Bureau projections that the “white” share of the national population will fall below 50 percent within 30 years have met with popular and intellectual concern, soul-searching, and at times, welcome. Far from objective data, however, these thought-provoking statistics are constructs that reflect prevailing beliefs about who “we”—and “they”—are. In the example above, the expectation that whites will no longer be a majority population in the U.S. depends on the view that Hispanic Americans are not white.
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Blumer Room - 402 Barrows Hall
  On the Line: Racial Boundaries at Work in the New South
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Blumer Room - 402 Barrows Hall
Rebecca Jean Emigh How States & Societies Count Censuses in Italy, the United States, and the United Kingdom Rebecca Jean Emigh will give a talk on a two-volume work co-authored with Dylan Riley and Patricia Ahmed. The volumes are entitled Antecedents of Censuses From Medieval to Nation States: How Societies and States Count (Volume 1) and Changes in Censuses from Imperialist to Welfare States: How Societies and States Count (Volume 2), Palgrave Macmillan, 2016. The authors explore a society-centered account of census taking in a broad historical and comparative perspective. Wednesday March 30th, 4:00-5:30 pm Social Science Matrix, Barrows Hall Room 832