Colloquia

Sociology Department Colloquium Series
Blumer Room - 402 Barrows Hall
MONDAYS, 2:00 - 3:30 PM
[unless otherwise noted]

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Blumer Room - 402 Barrows Hall
Between Blood and Sex: The Contradictory Impact of Transnational AIDS Institutions on State Repression in China, 1989-2013
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Blumer Room - 402 Barrows Hall
Innovation for a Cure: Social Learning in the National Cancer Institute’s Vaccine Programs
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Blumer Room - 402 Barrows Hall
Wage Stagnation and Buyer Power: How Buyer-Supplier Relations Affect U.S. Workers’ Wages, 1978-2014
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Blumer Room - 402 Barrows Hall
A Material Political Economy: The High-Frequency Trading of US Shares Ultrafast, automated ‘high-frequency trading’ or HFT now makes up around half of all US share trading. Drawing upon interviews with 54 high-frequency traders, MacKenzie’s talk will examine the ‘signals’ (patterns of data) that shape how HFT algorithms interact. He will argue that despite the high-technology glamour of autonomous, algorithmic economic agents, their behaviour is shaped by ‘political economy’ struggles — some with their origins in the 1970s — about how shares and other financial instruments should be traded. The underlying theoretical goal is to integrate the materialism of actor-network theory with the emphasis on meso-level conflict in field-theoretic economic sociology. The talk, however, will be quite concrete. MacKenzie will, for example, explain the effect of rain on patterns of US stock prices, and reveal the mundane feature of the US political system that underpins the HFT signal (‘futures lead’) on which he will focus.
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Blumer Room - 402 Barrows Hall
Gone Home: Race and Roots through Appalachia
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Blumer Room - 402 Barrows Hall
“Trading Land for Welfare”: Inequality and Citizenship Reform in Rural China
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Blumer Room - 402 Barrows Hall
Lifestyle algorithms: wearable technology as self-regulation
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Blumer Room - 402 Barrows Hall
Understanding Sexual Violence on a College Campus The Sexual Health Initiative to Foster Transformation (SHIFT) is one of the most comprehensive studies of sexual violence within a community. Taking two years, and drawing upon surveys, diaries, focus groups, interviews, and embedded ethnography, SHIFT is an attempt to systematically and scientifically understand sexual violence, and proposes community transformations that can help address and reduce it. In this talk Shamus Khan draws upon the SHIFT project to think through how we might better make sense of sexual violence, and what we might do to create healthier campus communities. 
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Blumer Room - 402 Barrows Hall
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Blumer Room - 402 Barrows Hall
NOTE LOCATION CHANGE: Matrix, 8th floor of Barrows Hall Creating Psychological Profiles From People's Digital Footprints