Colloquia

Sociology Department Colloquium Series
Blumer Room - 402 Social Sciences Building
MONDAYS, 2:00 - 3:30 PM
[unless otherwise noted]

-
Blumer Room - 402 Barrows Hall
 
-
Blumer Room - 402 Barrows Hall
  Taking the Longer Route: Tryouts and the Search Behavior of Structurally Disadvantaged Job–Seeker
-
Blumer Room - 402 Barrows Hall
  Demographic Threat and Whites' Racial Classification of Latinos How do members of dominant groups, like US Whites, react when their privileged social status is threatened, for example, by the prospect of numeric decline? Prior studies identify two sets of reactions: (1) Whites identify more strongly with ingroup members, and (2) they withhold material and symbolic resources from outgroup members. Boundary-making scholars raise another possibility: Whites may alter the boundary around Whiteness by redefining the criteria for membership. The present study uses an original survey experiment to examine how demographic threat affects US Whites’ classification of racially ambiguous Latinos. The results reveal that Whites are less—not more—likely to classify people who are ambiguously White or Latino as “White” under threat. The results contribute to a growing literature on the racial classification of multiracial and racially ambiguous people that has previously ignored ambiguity around the Latino category; they also intervene in an active debate about demographic projections and the classification decisions on which they rely.
-
Blumer Room - 402 Barrows Hall
  Deciding to Kill or Defecting to Save? Individual, Relational, and Organizational Processes
-
Blumer Room - 402 Social Sciences Building
Feb. 13th: SPECIAL COLLOQUIUM! WORKSHOP ON DIVERSITY AND INCLUSION IN THE CLASSROOM presented by Sociology Graduate Student Michel Estefan.  3:30-5 pm, 420 Barrows
-
Blumer Room - 402 Barrows Hall
  Co-sponsored by SOCA Immigrants and the Law: Crafting Moral Selves in the Face of Immigration Control US immigration laws criminalize unauthorized immigrants and render many of immigrants’ daily activities “illegal.” How does this affect immigrants’ attitudes and practices toward the law? Drawing on interviews with unauthorized Mexican immigrants in Philadelphia, this study examines how respondents resolve problems of law in their everyday lives. I show how time spent in the United States transforms migrants’ legal attitudes from one of “getting around the law” to one of “doing things the right way.” I highlight the implications of this legal transformation for the moral economy of immigration policy, for immigrant claims-making, and for Latino immigrants’ place in the racial hierarchy.  
-
Blumer Room - 402 Barrows Hall
  Increases in Sex with Same-Sex Partners Across Cohorts: How Gender and Racial Inequality Affect Trends   Successive cohorts of Americans born after 1920 have an increasing probability of having at least one sexual partner for their same sex, according to  an analysis using data from the General Social Survey. This increase is steeper among women than men. But gender also interacts with race, such that the increase is much steeper for black than white men, but not significantly different for black and white women. I point to the asymmetry of the gender revolution and the rise of mass incarceration as potential explanations for differences in trends by gender, race, and their intersections. 
-
Blumer Room - 402 Barrows Hall
  Deciding to Kill or Defecting to Save? Individual, Relational, and Organizational Processes
-
Blumer Room - 402 Barrows Hall
  The Mobilization of Resentment: Populism, Nationalism, and Authoritarianism in the United States and Europe
-
Blumer Room - 402 Barrows Hall
  A New Jim Code? From everyday apps to complex algorithms, technology has the potential to hide, speed, and even deepen discrimination, while appearing neutral and even benevolent when compared to racist practices of a previous era. In this talk, I present the concept of the “New Jim Code" to explore a range of discriminatory designs that encode inequity: by explicitly amplifying racial hierarchies, by ignoring but thereby replicating social divisions, or by aiming to fix racial bias but ultimately doing quite the opposite. We will also consider how race itself is a kind of tool designed to stratify and sanctify social injustice and discuss how technology is and can be used toward liberatory ends. This presentation takes us into the world of biased bots, altruistic algorithms, and their many entanglements, and provides conceptual tools to decode tech promises with sociologically informed skepticism. In doing so, it challenges us to question not only the technologies we are sold, but also the ones we manufacture ourselves.