Colloquia

Sociology Department Colloquium Series
Blumer Room - 402 Barrows Hall
MONDAYS, 2:00 - 3:30 PM
[unless otherwise noted]

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Blumer Room - 402 Barrows Hall
Imagined Futures  and Capitalist Dynamics
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Blumer Room - 402 Barrows Hall
Using Text as Data Methods to Discover, Measure, and Explain  Text as data methods are increasingly used in the social sciences to explore large scale collections of text.  This talk draws on my recent papers to show the distinct social science tasks that text as data methods can accomplish and provides a framework for evaluating those methods.  Using an example from the study of Congressional communication I show how text as data methods can help us to understand the connection between elected officials and constituents.  And an example survey experiment shows how text can be used to understand constituents' decisions in a democracy.  
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Blumer Room - 402 Barrows Hall
BERKELEY SOCIOLOGY FORUM & THE BERKELEY FACULTY ASSOCIATION Wednesday, February 1, 2017, 5-7.30p.m., 402 Barrows Hall The Great Mistake:  How We Wrecked Public Universities and How We Can Fix Them Christopher Newfieldis Professor of Literature and American Studies and the University of California, Santa Barbara. He will present his new book, The Great Mistake, with responses from Professors Kim Voss, Henry Brady and Prudence Carter.
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Blumer Room - 402 Barrows Hall
EEO Law, Courts, and the Production of Symbolic Civil Rights In Working Law: Courts, Corporations, and Symbolic Civil Rights (Chicago 2016), Lauren Edelman argues that we have become a symbolic civil rights society in which symbols of equal opportunity and diversity substitute have become accepted measures of compliance, influencing the ways in which lawyers, regulators, and even judges understand civil rights law.  This talk highlights three of the trends discussed in the book: the erosion of the progressive vision in the courts, the managerialization of law within organizations, and judicial deference to symbolic forms of organizational compliance.
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Blumer Room - 402 Barrows Hall
200 million test scores and what do we know? Income, race, and the geography of educational opportunity in the U.S.
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Blumer Room - 402 Barrows Hall
The accounted self: Scales, forms, and emotions in psychotherapy
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Blumer Room - 402 Barrows Hall
Fuel for Debate: Explaining Public Response to Hydraulic Fracturing
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Blumer Room - 402 Barrows Hall
Laboratories of Inequality: The Adoption of Smoke-free Laws and Inequality in Smoking in the United States
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Blumer Room - 402 Barrows Hall
Dealing in Desire: Asian Ascendancy, Western Decline, and the Hidden Currencies of Global Sex Work
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Blumer Room - 402 Barrows Hall
Climate Change and the Future of Cities What can sociology contribute to the study of climate change? What can it add to the roiling debates about how to mitigate, adapt, and transform the places we settle in the face of an existential threat to the future of our species, and many others as well? In this talk, Eric Klinenberg draws on his own research as well as his experience serving as Research Director of the federal government’s Rebuild By Design competition for rebuilding after Hurricane Sandy. He'll examine a number of urgent questions: How can cities can help reduce greenhouse gas emissions and create more sustainable forms of collective life? How can they protect vulnerable people and places from the outbursts of extreme weather that are becoming ever more likely to arrive? And can they adapt to global warming without making the world even more unequal?