Colloquia

Sociology Department Colloquium Series
Blumer Room - 402 Barrows Hall
MONDAYS, 2:00 - 3:30 PM
[unless otherwise noted]

via Zoom
Despite a slack labor market and major barriers to employment, including low-levels of human capital, substance abuse, and the mark of a criminal record, there is strong evidence that tribal men on the Yurok and Hoopa Valley Reservations of Northern California continue to seek work at high rates. Such labor force attachment is unexpected based on theories of cumulative disadvantage in urban areas, where slack labor market conditions (Liebow 1967, Wilson 1987, 1996) and individual barriers to employment (Holzer 1996, Holzer et al. 2006, Pager 2003, 2007, Pager et al. 2009, Pager & Western 2005) have been shown to inhibit labor force participation. The author poses the following research question to engage this puzzle: what explains the continued engagement of tribal men with the world of work despite these overlapping structural and individual constraints?
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Zoom (details to follow)
Chairman Mao’s Children: Politics, Generation, and China’s Difficult Memory
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Blumer Room - 402 Barrows Hall
Which Feminisms?
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Blumer Room - 402 Barrows Hall
Policing and Residential Segregation: Toward a Research and Policy Agenda
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Blumer Room - 402 Barrows Hall
Reception to follow in 420 Barrows Hall The Difficulty of Democracy in Democratic Socialism The greatest challenge for ecological democratic socialism is not the generation of just provisioning and protection of all sentient life.  The hard part is achieving this democratically, especially on a large scale and in a globally integrated world. The lecture meditates on this problem with reference to the utopian dreams of Erik Olin Wright. 
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Blumer Room - 402 Barrows Hall
Whom Do You Believe? Assessing Credibility of the Accuser and Accused in Sexual Assault
Blumer Room - 402 Barrows Hall
Paradoxes of Survivorhood: Becoming Legible after Domestic Violence
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Blumer Room - 402 Barrows Hall
Gender is changing rapidly in the twenty-first century, with boundaries becoming more mutable, liminal, and flexible. Survey-based research can help identify sites of gender inequality at the population level, but much of its implementation still reflects a narrow and flat categorization of individuals into two groups: male and female. Social constructionist and interactional approaches have been more successful in handling the major social changes that have taken place in terms of gender, but methodology in survey-based research has not yet caught up to qualitative work. Scholars of race and ethnicity have managed to incorporate embodied dimensions into large-scale survey research on inequality, but demographers interested in gender still lag behind.
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Blumer Room - 402 Barrows Hall
The Social Lives of Sexuality Statistics: Sexuality Knowledge, Demography, and the Politics of Population Measurement.