Colloquia

Sociology Department Colloquium Series
Blumer Room - 402 Barrows Hall
MONDAYS, 2:00 - 3:30 PM
[unless otherwise noted]

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Blumer Room - 402 Barrows Hall
co-sponsored with the Algorithmic Fairness and Opacity Working Group (AFOG) Karen Levy Data Driven: Truckers and The New Workplace Surveillance This talk examines how electronic monitoring systems in the U.S. trucking industry are used to compel truckers’ compliance with legal and organizational rules. For decades, truckers have kept track of their work time using easily falsified paper logbooks, and performed their work without too much regard for legal worktime limits. But new regulations will require truckers’ time to be monitored by digital systems, hard-wired into the trucks themselves, which remove much of the flexibility on which truckers have historically relied.
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Blumer Room - 402 Barrows Hall
Poverty, Place, and Time Constraints
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Blumer Room - 402 Barrows Hall
Counting Women Beyond Survival:  Post-Abortion Care and Global Reproductive Governance in Senegal.
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Blumer Room - 402 Barrows Hall
Protectors of Pluralism: Christian Minorities and the Rescue of Jews during the Holocaust
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Blumer Room - 402 Barrows Hall
Between Blood and Sex: The Contradictory Impact of Transnational AIDS Institutions on State Repression in China, 1989-2013
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Blumer Room - 402 Barrows Hall
Innovation for a Cure: Social Learning in the National Cancer Institute’s Vaccine Programs
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Blumer Room - 402 Barrows Hall
Wage Stagnation and Buyer Power: How Buyer-Supplier Relations Affect U.S. Workers’ Wages, 1978-2014
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Blumer Room - 402 Barrows Hall
A Material Political Economy: The High-Frequency Trading of US Shares Ultrafast, automated ‘high-frequency trading’ or HFT now makes up around half of all US share trading. Drawing upon interviews with 54 high-frequency traders, MacKenzie’s talk will examine the ‘signals’ (patterns of data) that shape how HFT algorithms interact. He will argue that despite the high-technology glamour of autonomous, algorithmic economic agents, their behaviour is shaped by ‘political economy’ struggles — some with their origins in the 1970s — about how shares and other financial instruments should be traded. The underlying theoretical goal is to integrate the materialism of actor-network theory with the emphasis on meso-level conflict in field-theoretic economic sociology. The talk, however, will be quite concrete. MacKenzie will, for example, explain the effect of rain on patterns of US stock prices, and reveal the mundane feature of the US political system that underpins the HFT signal (‘futures lead’) on which he will focus.
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Blumer Room - 402 Barrows Hall
Gone Home: Race and Roots through Appalachia
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Blumer Room - 402 Barrows Hall
“Trading Land for Welfare”: Inequality and Citizenship Reform in Rural China