Colloquia

Sociology Department Colloquium Series
Blumer Room - 402 Barrows Hall
MONDAYS, 2:00 - 3:30 PM
[unless otherwise noted]

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Blumer Room - 402 Barrows Hall
Using sampled social network data to estimate the size of hidden populations  Surveys have traditionally been based on the idea that researchers can estimate characteristics of a population by obtaining a sample of individuals and asking them to report about themselves. Network reporting surveys generalize this traditional approach by asking survey respondents to report about other people to whom they are connected. This approach can be used to study many important rare and hidden populations for which traditional survey methods are inadequate; for example, the approach has been used to estimate the size of epidemiologically important groups like sex workers, drug injectors, and men who have sex with men. It has also been used to estimate critical demographic quantities such as adult death rates. I will introduce a framework for developing estimators from network reporting surveys and then I will present some results from a nationally-representative survey experiment that my colleagues and I conducted in Rwanda.   
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Blumer Room - 402 Barrows Hall
Actuarial Labors:  Freedom to/at Risk in a Taxi to Uber Economy
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Blumer Room - 402 Barrows Hall
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Blumer Room - 402 Barrows Hall
The Growing Significance of Place: Assessing the Diverging Trajectories of DACA-eligible Young Adults Across Diverse Settings
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Blumer Room - 402 Barrows Hall
The Potlatch Revisited: Doing Display among the New Global Elite How does conspicuous consumption unfold in situations? The article challenges the interpretation of conspicuous consumption as a static feature of elites by developing an interactional approach to explain pecuniary display as situated collective accomplishment. Drawing from a multi-sited ethnography conducted in the global VIP party circuit from New York and Miami to Cannes, I show how nightclubs mobilize elites into conspicuous consumers with staged spending rituals akin to the potlatch in economic anthropology.
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Blumer Room - 402 Barrows Hall
Berkeley Sociology Forum, Wednesday, February 28, 5-7:30pm, 402 Barrows Hall Richard Lachmann, Professor of Sociology at the University at Albany, State University of New Yorkwill present his book, First Class Passengers on a Sinking Ship: Elite Politics and the Decline of Great Powers (Verso, Forthcoming) with responses from Jonah Stuart Brundage, Dylan Riley, and Cihan Tuğal  
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Blumer Room - 402 Barrows Hall
February 26 Barrows Hall 820 2-4pm Co-sponsored by the Social Science Matrix Kim Lane Scheppele, Princeton University Autocratic Legalism (with discussions by Dylan Riley and Jason Wittenberg)
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Blumer Room - 402 Barrows Hall
“A Nowadays Disease"? Aging, Gendered Sexuality and HIV/AIDS in a rural South African community
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Blumer Room - 402 Barrows Hall
The Great Experiment and the Great Reckoning: Decarceration and the Legal Reform of Mass Incarceration
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Blumer Room - 402 Barrows Hall
“I, too, Am Hungry”: Structural Exclusion at an Elite University Through major financial aid initiatives, colleges have increased access for undergraduates from disadvantaged backgrounds. While previous investigations of undergraduate life emphasize how differences in cultural capital shape students’ integration into college, I examine structural exclusion—how specific operational features of the college marginalize lower-income undergraduates—to highlight the university’s direct role in shaping social interactions and undergraduates’ sense of belonging. I draw on interviews with 103 undergraduates, two years of ethnographic observations, and data from administrative and online sources to show how lower-income undergraduates identify these policies as intentional and abrupt tears in the fabric of campus life that mark them as different for being poor. I interrogate the social and personal costs of exclusion and discuss implications for undergraduates’ opportunities and social well-being.