Colloquia

Sociology Department Colloquium Series
Blumer Room - 402 Barrows Hall
MONDAYS, 2:00 - 3:30 PM
[unless otherwise noted]

Blumer Room - 402 Barrows Hall
Pedagogy Colloquium: Wed., March 13th (4-5, 420 Barrows) for a discussion on exams, grading and evaluating students
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Blumer Room - 402 Barrows Hall
Ruth Milkman, Monday, March 11, 2-3:30pm in Barrows 402 De-unionization, Labor Degradation and the Immigrant Threat Narrative”
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Blumer Room - 402 Barrows Hall
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Blumer Room - 402 Barrows Hall
Taking the Longer Route: Tryouts and the Search Behavior of Structurally Disadvantaged Job–Seeker
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Blumer Room - 402 Barrows Hall
Demographic Threat and Whites' Racial Classification of Latinos
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Blumer Room - 402 Barrows Hall
Deciding to Kill or Defecting to Save? Individual, Relational, and Organizational Processes
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Blumer Room - 402 Barrows Hall
Feb. 13th: SPECIAL COLLOQUIUM! WORKSHOP ON DIVERSITY AND INCLUSION IN THE CLASSROOM presented by Sociology Graduate Student Michel Estefan.  3:30-5 pm, 420 Barrows
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Blumer Room - 402 Barrows Hall
Co-sponsored by SOCA Immigrants and the Law: Crafting Moral Selves in the Face of Immigration Control US immigration laws criminalize unauthorized immigrants and render many of immigrants’ daily activities “illegal.” How does this affect immigrants’ attitudes and practices toward the law? Drawing on interviews with unauthorized Mexican immigrants in Philadelphia, this study examines how respondents resolve problems of law in their everyday lives. I show how time spent in the United States transforms migrants’ legal attitudes from one of “getting around the law” to one of “doing things the right way.” I highlight the implications of this legal transformation for the moral economy of immigration policy, for immigrant claims-making, and for Latino immigrants’ place in the racial hierarchy.  
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Blumer Room - 402 Barrows Hall
Increases in Sex with Same-Sex Partners Across Cohorts: How Gender and Racial Inequality Affect Trends   Successive cohorts of Americans born after 1920 have an increasing probability of having at least one sexual partner for their same sex, according to  an analysis using data from the General Social Survey. This increase is steeper among women than men. But gender also interacts with race, such that the increase is much steeper for black than white men, but not significantly different for black and white women. I point to the asymmetry of the gender revolution and the rise of mass incarceration as potential explanations for differences in trends by gender, race, and their intersections. 
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Blumer Room - 402 Barrows Hall
Deciding to Kill or Defecting to Save? Individual, Relational, and Organizational Processes