Colloquia

Sociology Department Colloquium Series
Blumer Room - 402 Barrows Hall
MONDAYS, 2:00 - 3:30 PM
[unless otherwise noted]

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Blumer Room - 402 Barrows Hall
Feb. 13th: SPECIAL COLLOQUIUM! WORKSHOP ON DIVERSITY AND INCLUSION IN THE CLASSROOM presented by Sociology Graduate Student Michel Estefan.  3:30-5 pm, 420 Barrows
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Blumer Room - 402 Barrows Hall
Co-sponsored by SOCA Immigrants and the Law: Crafting Moral Selves in the Face of Immigration Control US immigration laws criminalize unauthorized immigrants and render many of immigrants’ daily activities “illegal.” How does this affect immigrants’ attitudes and practices toward the law? Drawing on interviews with unauthorized Mexican immigrants in Philadelphia, this study examines how respondents resolve problems of law in their everyday lives. I show how time spent in the United States transforms migrants’ legal attitudes from one of “getting around the law” to one of “doing things the right way.” I highlight the implications of this legal transformation for the moral economy of immigration policy, for immigrant claims-making, and for Latino immigrants’ place in the racial hierarchy.  
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Blumer Room - 402 Barrows Hall
Increases in Sex with Same-Sex Partners Across Cohorts: How Gender and Racial Inequality Affect Trends   Successive cohorts of Americans born after 1920 have an increasing probability of having at least one sexual partner for their same sex, according to  an analysis using data from the General Social Survey. This increase is steeper among women than men. But gender also interacts with race, such that the increase is much steeper for black than white men, but not significantly different for black and white women. I point to the asymmetry of the gender revolution and the rise of mass incarceration as potential explanations for differences in trends by gender, race, and their intersections. 
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Blumer Room - 402 Barrows Hall
Deciding to Kill or Defecting to Save? Individual, Relational, and Organizational Processes
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Blumer Room - 402 Barrows Hall
The Mobilization of Resentment: Populism, Nationalism, and Authoritarianism in the United States and Europe
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Blumer Room - 402 Barrows Hall
A New Jim Code? From everyday apps to complex algorithms, technology has the potential to hide, speed, and even deepen discrimination, while appearing neutral and even benevolent when compared to racist practices of a previous era. In this talk, I present the concept of the “New Jim Code" to explore a range of discriminatory designs that encode inequity: by explicitly amplifying racial hierarchies, by ignoring but thereby replicating social divisions, or by aiming to fix racial bias but ultimately doing quite the opposite. We will also consider how race itself is a kind of tool designed to stratify and sanctify social injustice and discuss how technology is and can be used toward liberatory ends. This presentation takes us into the world of biased bots, altruistic algorithms, and their many entanglements, and provides conceptual tools to decode tech promises with sociologically informed skepticism. In doing so, it challenges us to question not only the technologies we are sold, but also the ones we manufacture ourselves.
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Blumer Room - 402 Barrows Hall
Reparative Seizure: Postcolonial Crime in the Jamaican Lotto Scam
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Blumer Room - 402 Barrows Hall
Taste and Necessity: Economic and Symbolic Influences on Food Choice in Low- and Higher-Income Families
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Blumer Room - 402 Barrows Hall
DISENFRANCHISED The Rise and Fall of Industrial Citizenship in China JOEL ANDREAS, AssociateProfessor of Sociology at Johns Hopkins University, will present his forthcoming book, Disenfranchised, with responses from Cihan Tuğal, Yan Long, and Marc Blecher
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Blumer Room - 402 Barrows Hall
That Ain’t Right. Toxic Entanglements, Urban Austerity and Environmental Racism in Flint and Detroit